Elizabeth Warren to Trump: ‘You Ain’t Seen Nasty Yet’

As conservatives know, one of the loudest, angriest voices in the Senate belongs to arch-liberal Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. The shrill, 68-year-old perennial crank has repeatedly claimed to “champion” the rights of consumers, despite not actually having accomplished much of anything in her four-year Senate career.

Warren, who was a law professor at Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania for 30 years before becoming a Senator, has a spotty history regarding her background, as President Trump has publicly pointed out, referring to the Senator as “Pocahontas” for her almost certainly false claims of boasting American Indian ancestry.

In fact, it was these claims of ancestry that allowed Warren to get her teaching jobs in the first place at those Ivy League schools because she was able to claim she was a “person of color” on her employment applications (which both schools have never seen fit to release to the press). Warren now acknowledges that these claims were not made because of any blood relatives or DNA testing, but were merely based on the speculations of her grandfather, who supposedly remarked on Warren’s high cheekbones when she was young, telling her that she must have had “Indian blood.” Warren was further able to capitalize on this myth by coauthoring a Native American cookbook — “Pow Wow Chow” — but sadly, three of the four “original” recipes she contributed turned out to be plagiarized (and one wasn’t even an Indian recipe to begin with).

But Warren hasn’t let this controversy stop her from using Republican policies as grist for her partisan “consumer protection” public relations mill, powered by the zealotry and rabidity of liberal Massachusetts voters, who have sorely missed the politics (if not the scandals) of their dearly departed longtime Senator Edward Kennedy. For a good deal of her career, Warren has taken up much valuable time in the Senate making sure that credit card companies have toll-free consumer hotlines and that savings accounts actually pay some sort of minute amount of interest to account holders.

This was after failing to be nominated as the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau by former President Obama, despite many of her supporters believing she was the best person suited for the job. But Obama knew enough about Warren’s tyrannical nature to realize that the Senate would never confirm her for fear of what she might do to financial institutions, so she was named a special advisor to the Bureau instead.

Hillary Clinton, too, was reportedly wary of Warren’s extremely progressive leanings and intensity after the former Secretary of State had initially given tentative signs that she would consider Warren as a running mate for her presidential bid in 2016 (Virginia Senator Tim Kaine ultimately got the vice-presidential nod last July). And it was Clinton who Trump referred to as a “nasty woman” in the final presidential debate of the race after the former candidate affirmed she would raise taxes to pay the government’s spiraling national debt. “My Social Security payroll contribution will go up, as will Donald’s, assuming he can’t figure out how to get out of it,” she quipped. “Such a nasty woman,” Trump deadpanned in response.

Apparently the “nasty woman” phrase was one that Warren took a particular liking to, because at a recent book reading in New York, where the Senator was reciting passages of her new tome, “This Fight Is Our Fight,” she decided to quote sign slogans she’d seen at the Boston, Massachusetts affiliate of the Washington, D.C. Women’s March that took place in January. One of the signs Warren saw read “Donald, you ain’t seen nasty yet.” Re-reading these words out loud in New York seemed to electrify Warren, who couldn’t seem to contain herself when she exclaimed, “This is a good sign!” Warren then recalled the January event in her home state, saying that “As I marched in Boston with tens of thousands of others that day, I had no illusions. I knew it would be a hard fight. I knew there would be dark moments. But I knew that we had tens of millions of people with us, and this fight would be our fight.”

Of course, for the privilege of hearing Warren read these words, her supporters had fought for the right to pay between $45 and $50 per ticket at New York’s Town Hall, a Midtown performance venue — not exactly populist prices, even for upscale New York City. Warren confessed that another of her favorite signs read, “Women’s rights are not up for grabs!”; the “grabbing” likely referred to ill-advised comments made privately by Trump years ago on a private Access Hollywood bus.

“The character of a nation is not the character of its president. The character of a nation is the character of its people,” intoned Warren. Of course, character may be one of the only traits Warren can criticize the president on, because as a supposed “savior of the middle class,” Warren has to confront the reality that both Trump and his Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin have vowed to cut —rather than raise — taxes for middle-class voters and strengthen competition between financial institutions.

Previously, Warren had promised her constituents that if a 2010 bill to create the consumer protection agency she became an advisor for didn’t have “teeth,” she would rather see no agency at all created and instead have “plenty of blood and teeth left on the floor.”

An unapologetic Warren later bragged to MSNBC host Rachel Maddow that “I have thrown rocks at people that I think are in the wrong. I’ve done it before, I’ve continued to do it, and I’m going to do it in the future.” Warren also provocatively stated that she hopes Republicans “leave their bodies to science” because she “would like to cut them open.”

Whether these aforementioned remarks or the “nasty woman” comment were made in preparation for a potential presidential run in 2020 is difficult to ascertain. Warren has denied that she’s in the running for the 2020 contest, yet she remains one of the most highly visible and popular figures in the Democratic Party. Although it must be said that if one looks at her meager record, it’s likely that her support is drawn more from her bark than her bite.

Whether that bark will be enough to match President Trump’s is an open question, but if Trump’s one-word quip of “Pocahontas” is anything to go by, a possible Warren-Trump matchup could easily send Warren back on the first boat to rejoin her loyal “tribe” on Massachusetts’ Chappaquiddick Island.


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