Are These People Blind? What Does the Virus Data Tell You?

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has been studying the data from virus patients for the last month or so. It’s nice to finally have some real numbers, so we can begin drawing some factual conclusions without having to rely on numbers from… you know… that other country which is not noted for its honesty and transparency.

But even with real numbers to work with, the CDC has reached a truly bizarre conclusion: Racism is to blame for the death toll in America. No, really.

According to the latest report from the CDC, “black and brown communities have been ‘disproportionately affected’” by this global pandemic. Uh oh. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA), who probably knows a thing or two about infectious diseases, immediately jumped in to explain. She’s also introduced a bill called the “COVID-19 Racial and Ethnic Disparities Task Force Act” – a bill that would create government jobs for people to examine how racism resulted in people catching this virus.

Harris explained that more minorities caught the virus “due in large part to disparities in access to health care, systemic barriers to affordable housing, and environmental injustice that existed long before the pandemic.”

Huh? The reason why we know people caught the virus is because they tested positive for it. Where exactly were they tested, Sen. Harris? How does that translate to racism denying them access to health care? And what do barriers to affordable housing and environmental injustice have to do with anything?

Whatever. It’s all racism according to the Senator who is angling to shove Stacey Abrams aside for Joe Biden’s VP slot.

Hey, wait a minute. What do the CDC’s actual numbers say? I’ll get to that in a second.

 

If you think back to February, I was lambasted for saying that this virus was a genetically modified, unfinished and racial bioweapon that China accidentally released from a lab due to their communist sloppiness. Family members laughed at me for my theory that because the coronavirus latches onto the ACE2 receptors (an enzyme prevalent in the lungs), people of ethnic backgrounds with more ACE2 receptors would be more likely to catch the virus and would suffer worse outcomes from it.

My theory, based on that scientific evidence that we had at the time, was that people of white European ancestry would be least likely to die from the virus, blacks would slightly more likely, Hispanics even more likely than blacks, and Asians would get it the worst. That’s not racism, everyone – it is science. You can pretend that we’re all the same under our skin, but we have genetic differences. Those differences are based on who you are related to in the past, i.e., people of your race.

Other races have proportionally more ACE2 receptors in the lungs than Europeans. Fact.

Anyway, here are the CDC numbers:

Whites accounted for 36% of coronavirus infections in the US.

Blacks, who make up 13.4% of the US population, accounted for 22% of coronavirus infections.

Hispanics, who make up 18% of the US population, accounted for 33% of coronavirus infections.

And the CDC didn’t have much, if any data on coronavirus impact on Asians in the US population.

In other words, blacks have been hit by the virus worse than whites, and Hispanics have really been hammered by it.

I’m not saying this is an argument for any sort of superiority – it’s a warning. People of non-European ancestry have a much more difficult time with this virus, due to genetics (and because China intentionally made the bioweapon that way). This is an alert to be more careful as the virus rampages through the country. And if we have a second round of this in the fall they’ll need to be more careful again.

Politicizing the virus by claiming that racism results in people catching it is the worst possible thing that someone can do. Which is why the CDC and Kamala Harris are politicizing it.


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